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Is the harm reduction approach a possible answer to treating drug addiction?

Is the harm reduction approach a possible answer to treating drug addiction?

Posted on August 14th, 2017

With the rising trend in rampant drug abuse, researchers are constantly exploring new ways of controlling the epidemic that continues to affect millions of people in the United States. Those who are willing to cure their addiction problems enter into a rehab facility or consciously practice abstinence on their own. The traditional approaches to treating addiction-related problems include individual or group counseling, inpatient and outpatient treatments, detox services, medication and post-recovery care. Amid all these, a new strategy is also currently garnering attention among the medical fraternity. It is the harm reduction approach, which involves reducing harm to the body and mind by reducing the drug intake.  Continue reading

Benefits of Suboxone over Subutex for treating opioid addiction

Benefits of Suboxone over Subutex for treating opioid addiction

Posted on October 14th, 2016

Addiction to any substance often causes effects leading to severe health issues and sometimes it may even prove to be fatal. Addictive substances used in the United States are not limited to alcohol and drugs, but also include prescription drugs. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 165,000 individuals in the U.S. died due to prescription opioid overdose between 1999 and 2014. Continue reading

Life after detox: What to do next?

Life after detox: What to do next?

Posted on January 23rd, 2016

Making the first move in addiction recovery can unequivocally be the most difficult step a patient has to take. Each step can be a struggle, but as the distance towards the goal becomes shorter, things usually tend to get easier. However, coping with life after detoxification is much harder and some nagging questions may still linger on – what to do after detox; and how will life be after detox? Continue reading

Going cold turkey can be a big mistake

Going cold turkey can be a big mistake

Posted on October 15th, 2015

“I quit.”

If you say that as a kid playing Little League, you’re probably in for a lecture. Say that to your employer and you’ll probably be obliged.  Telling your addictions that you’re ready to quit….well, that’s bravery. Sobriety’s a tough, often scary leap into the unknown and anyone making it deserves commendation. But too often, there’s an assumption that addictions can be quit on a dime, full stop, cold turkey. That’s a mistake. Continue reading

Methamphetamine withdrawal is a big challenge

Methamphetamine withdrawal is a big challenge

Posted on October 13th, 2015

That probably won’t be news to anyone who’s spent time around methamphetamine addicts, but meth’s gotten a reputation in some circles that it’s a relatively easy and painless substance to detox from. Ask any heroin addict that got clean, and they’ll tell stories of the purgatory-like ordeal that is heroin withdrawal. Physical and mental agony likely played starring roles in their accounts, and their journey to sobriety was probably a long and difficult one. In fact, heroin withdrawal can be so rough for some users it can make withdrawal from other substances look tame by comparison. Continue reading

Razing Arizona: heroin’s easy availability in Arizona a big problem

Razing Arizona: heroin’s easy availability in Arizona a big problem

Posted on October 8th, 2015

For a long time, heroin wasn’t seen as something that could affect anyone. Heroin was a niche drug, a drug for the counterculture. Jazz and rock musicians used heroin, along with desperate people in inner cities stumbling from fix to fix. Suburbs, rural areas, the upwardly mobile… heroin didn’t touch them.

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Women are increasing casualties in the war on drugs

Women are increasing casualties in the war on drugs

Posted on September 22nd, 2015

Since the late 1960s, the U.S. government has aggressively attempted to curtail the manufacture, sale and use of illicit narcotics in what has become commonly known as the War on Drugs. The effects of this so-called war are pervasive, from news of high-profile narcotic seizures by law enforcement, to the extra red tape required to purchase certain over-the-counter medications. And increasingly, another effect is rippling on the surface: more and more women are winding up in prison with lengthy jail sentences. Continue reading